Faster than a Blackbird

Faster than a Blackbird

I have been an utter idiot. I was late picking my girlfriend from work so I nailed my old Blackbird down the bypass. Long story short, I got clocked doing 148mph by the Police in a lay-by using a laser device.

I didn’t rag off but stopped and admitted the offence. He was a nice chap and said I may get some points and a fine. However I have now been summoned to court regarding the speeding and also dangerous driving.

I am happy to pay a fine but I can’t afford to lose my licence as I’m a builder and have to drive a van. Can speeding equate to dangerous driving? What can I do? Will telling the court I’m going on a Police safety day prevent me from being banned?

Answer

The Police safety day on its own is not enough from getting you banned, but may help a bit in trying to reduce the level of your sentence. With regards to dangerous driving the answer is yes, traveling at 148mph in a 70mph (or whatever the speed limit was) can amount to dangerous driving.

In simple terms, as far as the law is concerned, dangerous driving is driving in a manner which falls far below what would be expected of a competent and careful driver. As such, a court will likely view that traveling at more than twice the speed limit can amount to dangerous driving and I find it difficult to imagine you would be able to prove otherwise.

While I’m sympathetic to your job situation, dangerous driving on its own carries a sentence of a disqualification for a minimum of 12 months and a maximum of two years in prison. You now need to get a specialist solicitor with a view to ‘damage limitation’ and trying to obtain the most lenient sentence possible.

Andrew ‘Chef’ Prendergast

Motorcycle Monthly October 2016

Posted by Andrew Prendergast. Posted on: November 10, 2016 at 12:00 am

Andrew has been riding motorcycles since he was 10 years old and currently rides a GSX1400 as his daily commuter whether it is sunny or snowing. In addition, he is currently restoring an old Honda CB750 K1. Andrew practices across all areas of motorcycle law, with his practice involving both civil claims and motoring defence work.