Speeding on a provisional

Speeding on a provisional

My wife insured me to ride her old Kawasaki ZZR600, but I recently got clocked for speeding, doing 35mph in a 30mph limit.

She got a Notice ofIntended Prosecution through the post, and has been asked in the letter to identify the rider. The problem is, I never told her I only had a provisional licence, and she insured me on the basis that I had a full licence.

I didn’t think it would matter as I only used the bike to pop to the shops, and sometimes to get myself to and from work. She has done her absolute nut now that she’s found out what I’ve done. What can I do to get out of this?

Answer

Your actions may well land your wife in a whole heap of crap. I really do pity her, you absolute numpty.

You have a couple of choices. If she ignores the request for driver information, then she will likely be summonsed to court for failing to give information. This carries a punishment of six penalty points and a fine of up to £1000. If, however, she does identify you as the driver, then you might just get offered a fixed penalty. If you accept the fixed penalty offer then that maybe the end of the matter. If you’re lucky.

But, I certainly could not guarantee that the police will not ‘join up the dots’ and discover you only had a provisional licence. In this scenario you could get summonsed for other offences, such as riding otherwise in accordance with a licence, and riding without insurance.

Furthermore, your wife could be summonsed too, for letting you ride without insurance. My advice is don’t flag up the issue with the police, and make a decision when you know what is going to happen. Lastly, be prepared to pay your wife’s legal bill if you have any shred of decency.

Andrew Prendergast

Motorcycle Monthly

www.morebikes.co.uk

January 2015

Posted by Andrew Prendergast. Last modified: March 23, 2018 at 4:50 pm

Andrew has been riding motorcycles since he was 10 years old and currently rides a ZZR1400 as his daily commuter whether it is sunny or snowing. In addition, he is currently restoring an old Honda CB750 K1. Andrew practices across all areas of motorcycle law, with his practice involving both civil claims and motoring defence work.

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