Don’t ride like a bike journalist

Don’t ride like a bike journalist

We do it to, ahem, examine the capabilities of our test bikes (your honor). You do it and you’ll get nicked

Pulling wheelies

You see it as a demonstration of skill and control, they see it as a daft way to lose the majority of your braking power and steering ability and your view ahead. Some forces like the Met will actually slap you with a Dangerous Driving charge or a Without Due Care charge at the merest hint of one. If you’re lucky, you can argue that it was simply a power wheelie or that the bike was new and you weren’t used to its power-characteristics – maybe. White Dalton has had a dangerous driving wheelie charge reduced to without due care for this.

Getting your knee down?

Once more we’re in the realm of the officer’s discretion. If you’re far from the madding crowd, then he may simply wave you in and give you a lecture. If you’re going round-and-round your favourite scratching roundabout, then they can stop you on an environmental law because you’re wasting gas going in circles. Car drivers can be stitched on this for leaving their car running. They can also say you’re ‘failing to use the highway responsibly’ and move you on. All a non-biking magistrate will see is a loon in leather scraping his patella on the ground and agree with the feds.

COPS & NOBBERS PART II – Courting Disaster
Superbike Magazine – November 2006
By: Bertie Simmonds

Disclaimer: This article is reproduced from Superbike Magazine – It’s views do not represent White Dalton’s

Posted by Andrew Dalton. Last modified: March 26, 2018 at 11:27 am

Andrew Dalton is a highly experienced trial lawyer who delights in taking on difficult and demanding motorcycle cases. He has a tough and relentless litigation style and is utterly focused on getting the best possible outcomes for his clients.

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